Oh dear, it’s November now and I’ve not written the promised second part of my Lean Agile Scotland review. So no more excuses or procrastinating…

People

People Patterns by Joe O’Brien

I’d heard that Joe’s People Patterns talk was really good. I can now confirm that “really good” doesn’t do it justice. I could relate to so many of the issues he talked about and cannot agree more that projects don’t succeed or fail for technical reasons, they do so because of people. If you get the chance to see his talk, go see it. Failing that, listen/watch to it at Lean Agile Scotland 2012 videos.

Slightly off-topic, I had the pleasure of meeting Joe at a lunch with some friends a year or so ago. I was having a bad day and most likely came across like an angry dick, and I really regret that. Completely ignoring some of the points from People Patterns about talking to people, I put off going to speak to him to apologise for my behavior until it was too late and by then he’d already left.

Respect For People by Liz Keogh

It turns out that I can be very disrespectful and I didn’t even notice (see lunch with @objo above for details). Liz examined the roots of various words common in the Lean & Agile vocabulary and related it to the sorts of interactions we’re all familiar with in software development.

I tried the suggestion of not asking people to go next at our stand-up (it’s dis-respectful because I am demanding an update from them, rather than them providing it on their own). This led to a long awkward silence after my turn. Once I’d explained my thinking and talked about Liz’s keynote, the silences got a little shorter and I like to think the rest of the team understood what I was getting at.

Rightshifting track

On the second day, track one had 3 rightshifting sessions back to back. I’d read a little about it, talked a little about it at the Lean Agile Glasgow meet-up, but I didn’t really understand it. To my untrained eye, it looked like a variation on CMMI maturity model…but on it’s side rather than a pyramid. I’m glad to say that once Bob Marshall had assembled us into a circle and talking with us, it all became a lot clearer. I also left with an understanding of why large, established firms can find moving to an Agile process to be so painful.

Ian Carroll’s “Rightshifting in action, using Kanban for organisational change” was also riveting. I’d seem his webcast on Systemic Flow Mapping before and after that session I am even more motivated to perform the exercise in the business unit I work for. Maybe nearer Christmas I’ll find the time. I suspect a first attempt will be more of a learning exercise but even asking the questions and trying to describe the current process should be very revealing.

I didn’t manage to attend Torbjörn Gyllebring’s session, but I’ll be watching the video soon.

Why Agile Fails – Matt Wynne

I liked Matt’s presentation style and found the content engaging and interesting. My key points to take away were:

Wynne’s 1st Law of Software Delivery: If it isn’t fun, you’re doing it wrong.

I’ve used that a number of times myself now 🙂

The other key point was around Cargo Cults and Shu Ha Ri, which describes the learning process as (please excuse my poor rephrasing):

  • Shu – we practice the forms rigorously and without deviation
  • Ha – once disciplined, make innovations and question the forms
  • Ri – completely depart from the forms, open the door to creative technique, and arrive in a place where we act in accordance with what our heart/mind desires, unhindered while not overstepping laws

That last step really does sound like the phase we all want to be in, but the first phase is also very similar to when you see Scrum cargo cults in large organisations. Matt stressed that we shouldn’t look down on those teams as the first stage certainly does show similarities with Cargo Cults. However, the differentiation here is that a Cargo Cult doesn’t realise that it’s just the first step on the path to understanding…and maybe they just need some appropriate assistance or coaching to make that mental leap.

So, what now?

Well, those are my highlights of Lean Agile Scotland 2012 from the perspective of what gave me cause to stop and think/re-think about how I approach things. I enjoyed it all, and I can’t wait until Lean Agile Scotland 2013.

My team is moving from a Scrum process (which we’d tailored somewhat over the years) to something more Kanban, dropping estimation…or at least only giving very brief, initial estimates or deciding to break stories into smaller pieces.

I am determined to construct a Systemic Flow Map of my business area. I think it would reveal all sorts of valuable information about how our teams could work more collaboratively and streamline the work we do. I’m likely to blog about that for advice because I still have questions about exactly how to do it.

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